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DST and work

General information

The effects of the clock change concerning work are very diverse and widespread. Most of us may have experienced that the DST-Change can lead to a late (or even early) arrival at work. However, this is still one of the rather harmless consequences, as the person concerned is late for work, but propably well rested.

It is obvious that time change-related fatigue can represent a real risk at work. This already begins travelling to work, as there is evidence that the daylight-saving time increases the risk of traffic accidents (see also here). But the risk of accidents is also increased at the workplace itself - according to a study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, the changeover to summer time in spring in particular is accompanied by an increased rate of injuries at the workplace. No miracle, because on the average the employee had 40 minutes less sleep in the night before.

Productivity at the workplace also appears to be declining as a result of the time change due to fatigue and lack of concentration. This can also be seen, for example, in a significant increase in cyberloafing (the use of the Internet at work for private purposes, e.g. Facebook, etc.), as a study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology was able to prove.

On the other hand, employees also benefit from summer time. The extended daylight hours allow employees to enjoy an additional hour of free time in the sunshine after work. In addition, when there is more daylight during working hours and  a workplace with a window or even outdoors, this is not only pleasant, but also promotes the ability to concentrate.

There are also many friends of summer time among business representatives - and not without reason. Because the extended daylight free time also leads to more money being spent on leisure activities - e.g. shopping, but also at festivals in bars and restaurants. The tourism industry in particular will certainly benefit from the daylight saving regulation. For example, the Belfast Telegraph reported that in Northern Ireland at least 6.34 million extra pounds are taken in each year by tourists due to the longer daylight time.

DST and night service

DST brings problems for many people. Sleep and concentration problems are common. People who work in night duty are particularly affected, because just like for all of us, the time changes for them, raising some problems and questions. An hour more during the day or at night is not so easy to cope with.

If a night worker also has to work one hour longer due to the Fall-DST change depends on whether it is regulated in the contract. The employer is naturally interested in avoiding the theoretical gap in shift changes and can therefore order the extra hour.
Whether or not this has to be paid also depends on the regulations. Many employment contracts stipulate that a certain number of overtime hours are covered by the gross pay - this regulation then also applies to the additional hour in case of conversion to winter time. If, on the other hand, there is a fixed weekly working time which would now be exceeded, the additional hour must also be paid as overtime.
Either it is then evaluated directly as overtime or, if necessary, also offset against a working time account.
In principle, a working time of eight hours may not be exceeded if no compensation can be given within a month.

The changeover itself is very stressful, especially for experienced night shift workers, since the carefully trained rhythm is now out of step.
You can find out how best to cope with the extended night shift and how to quickly find a restful sleep in the morning in our recommendations against the time change jetlag.


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